Practice for everyday activity

Transferring in and out of bed

When getting into bed:

  • Step backwards to the middle of the bed until you feel it touching the back of both your legs.
  • Take one small step forwards with your operated leg (if needed).
  • Remove your crutches, please them into an ‘H’shape and hold with one hand.
  • Reach back with your other arm and sit onto the edge of the bed.
  • Place your crutches within easy reach.
  • Using your arms behind you, bring your bottom towards the middle of the bed.
  • Bring your legs up onto the bed whilst using your arms to help you, turn your body at the same time.
  • TAKE CARE - Do NOT allow your operated leg to twist or cross your midline.
  • Once your legs are supported move into the middle of the bed.

 

When getting out of bed:

  • Move yourself to the side of the bed.
  • Slide your legs off the edge of the bed whilst using your arms behind you to move your body around.
  • TAKE CARE – Do NOT allow your operated leg to twist or cross your midline.
  • Once sitting, place your operate leg slightly in front of your good leg (if needed).
  • Place your crutches in an ‘H’ shape, hold with
    one hand and push up from the bed using the other arm.
  • Once standing, place your arms into both crutches before moving away from the edge of the bed.

Watch a short video on how to do this



Managing stairs

This will be practised with the Physiotherapist. This is to ensure that you can manage this safely with your current walking aids. If you feel anxious about managing this at home it may be useful to have a friend or relative with you initially. You may also wish to write out the routine and stick it to the wall at the top and bottom of your stairs as a reminder.

Remember going up steps:
good leg leads up first,
then operated leg,
then crutches.

Down steps:
crutches first,
then operated leg,
then good leg.

Watch a short video on how to do this


Transferring into a car as a passenger

  • Ensure you sit in the front passenger seat of the car.
  • Push the car seat all the way back and recline it.
  • If needed, place a small cushion or folded towel onto the back of the seat to make it level.
  • Step backwards to the car until you feel it touching the back of your legs.
  • Take a step forwards with your operated leg.
  • Reach back with both hands and lower yourself into the seat.
  • Slide back towards the driver’s seat to allow more room for getting your legs into the car.
  • Turn towards the dashboard and lean backwards as you lift the operated leg into the car.
  • TAKE CARE – Do NOT flex your hip past 90 degrees or cross your midline.

Watch a short video on how to do this

Lower body dressing with a pick up stick.

Use your pick up stick to put on and take off your pants. Always dress your operated leg first. Rest your pants on your lap. Use the claw of pick up stick to hold the front of the pants on the operated side. While holding onto pants with pick up stick, push pants to the floor and put the operated leg into the pants. Pull pants up to your knee using the stick then use your hands to pull your foot through. Repeat for the other leg then stand to pull your pants all the way up.

Watch a short video on how to do this

Exercises for before and after hip replacement

Exercises for before and after hip replacement 

It is important to be as fit as possible before undergoing a total hip replacement, as it will make your recovery much faster.  To enable a quick recovery so you may get back into the activity you previously enjoyed, it is very important to follow an exercise rehabilitation program. This will ensure the muscles of the joint recover their strength and maintain a stable joint.


Following the operation, your physiotherapist will help you with the initial exercises and help you be able to reach certain milestones before you leave the hospital. You will be sent home with an exercise program and will be expected to attend clinics and further physiotherapy appointments in order to continue to progress through your rehabilitation program.

The following information is a general guide to types of exercises and what to expect, but the individual program your physiotherapist or surgeon has prescribed should always be adhered to. It is important that you consult with your surgeon and /or physiotherapist as to which exercises are best for you, how often you need to do them and how many times to repeat each exercise.

Seek advice from your health professional before starting any new exercise program.

If you find these exercises difficult, build up to the suggested number gradually.  However if any exercise is too painful, stop it immediately.

Watch a video of all exercises

Or view individual exercises below

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Next Steps

Contact your GP or health professional to discuss your options